Kirsten Gillibrand admits she opposed Trump’s Supreme Court candidates over Roe v. Wade

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Kirsten Gillibrand said on Sunday she opposed Donald Trump’s three Supreme Court candidates because she feared they would overturn Roe v. Wade and threaten women’s abortion rights.

“I am very concerned,” the New York senator told CNN’s State of the Union when asked what she thought of an upcoming case involving abortion laws.

“This is one of the reasons why I strongly opposed the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett. This is why I strongly opposed the nomination of Neil Gorsuch and Justice [Brett] Kavanaugh, ”she continued, animating Jake Tapper. “These judges were presented on a very political agenda, very deliberately by President Trump and by Mitch McConnell.”

The Supreme Court agreed to hear a case in the fall over a Mississippi law that bans abortion after 15 weeks, about eight weeks earlier than the law made legal in the landmark Roe v abortion case. . Wade.

New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand said on Sunday that she opposed all of Donald Trump’s Supreme Court candidates because she feared it would void abortion rights granted in the landmark case of Roe v. Wade

“I am very concerned,” Gillibrand said when asked what she thought of an upcoming case involving abortion laws. “This is one of the reasons I strongly opposed the appointment of Amy Coney Barrett”

Judge Neil Gorsuch

Judge Brett Kavanaugh

Gillibrand said she also opposed Judges Neil Gorsuch (left) and Brett Kavanaugh (right) for the same reasons.

She also criticized the then-Republican-controlled Senate for blocking the nomination of Merrick Garland for a Supreme Court seat when a seat opened under Barack Obama after the death of Tory Judge Antonin Scalia.

“Back to the lack of goodwill, once again Amy Coney Barrett was elected moments before the next election – just days. And we couldn’t ask Merrick Garland to have an audience for more than a year, ”she lamented.

At the time of Coney Barrett’s appointment, however, Gillibrand admitted that even though the process was “legitimate”, she still opposed its confirmation as she is pro-life and against the Affordable Care Act.

“President Trump’s appointment of Justice Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court represents the further degradation of our democracy and the continued politicization of our justice system,” she wrote in a statement in September 2020.

“Even though this process had been legitimate, Barrett’s anti-choice views, her opposition to the Affordable Care Act, and her hostility to immigrant and civil rights make her completely unfit to sit on the Supreme Court. I vehemently oppose Barrett’s nomination and will vote against his confirmation. ‘

Earlier this month, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the case of a Mississippi state law that bans nearly all abortions after the 15th week of pregnancy, giving it the ability to considerably weaken the Roe of 1973. c. Wade decision.

The case will be the first abortion case heard since the Republican Senate confirmed Judge Amy Coney Barrett in the final weeks of the Trump administration.

The case is emerging as a major test of the court’s new conservative 6-3 majority.

On hearing the case, judges will consider whether to overturn a central part of the landmark ruling, a long-standing goal of religious conservatives.

In Roe v. Wade, later reaffirmed in 1992, the court said states cannot ban abortion until the fetus is viable outside the womb, which is generally considered by doctors to be between 24 and 28 weeks. Mississippi law would ban abortion much earlier than that.

The Supreme Court agreed earlier this month to hear a fall case over a Mississippi law banning 15-week abortion, about eight weeks - or two months - earlier than what's currently allowed by Roe v.  Wade

The Supreme Court agreed earlier this month to hear a fall case over a Mississippi law banning 15-week abortion, about eight weeks – or two months – earlier than what’s currently allowed by Roe v. Wade

This will be the first abortion case heard by Coney Barrett since she joined the court.  It will also be a major test of the court's new conservative 6-3 majority

This will be the first abortion case heard by Coney Barrett since she joined the court. It will also be a major test of the court’s new conservative 6-3 majority

The Roe v. Wade acknowledged that a constitutional right to privacy protects a woman’s ability to obtain an abortion.

The court, in its 1992 decision in Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey, reaffirmed the ruling and prohibited laws that place an “undue burden” on a woman’s ability to obtain an abortion.

Texas also tightened its restrictions on termination of pregnancy, this month becoming the largest state with a law banning abortions before many women even know they are pregnant.

Republican Gov. Greg Abbott on Wednesday signed the bill that brings Texas into compliance with more than a dozen other states that ban abortions after a fetal heartbeat is detected, which can occur as early as six weeks of age. pregnancy.

There is also a unique provision in the new law that essentially leaves enforcement to private citizens through lawsuits against doctors or anyone who assists a woman in having an abortion, including nurses, reception staff or even the person who brought the patient to the abortion appointment.

There are no written exceptions in Texas law for incest or rape cases.


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